David Eddings dies at 77

I picked this news up on Twitter yesterday and I’m still having trouble learning all the details, but it has been confirmed. It’s very sad news indeed that David Eddings, fantasy storyteller extraordinaire has died. Eddings was the author of many books, but most significantly for me were The Belgariad and The Mallorean.

belgariad-1

Pawn Of Prophecy, Book 1 of The Belgariad

I remember being a teenager of about thirteen when I first discovered The Belgariad and it got to the point where I was desperately awaiting the release of the last volumes, buying them the day they arrived in bookstores. The same thing happened again when I was a little older and the sequel series, The Mallorean, was released between 1987 and 1991.

I’d not long been a fan of fantasy when I discovered The Belgariad, having fallen for the genre with The Hobbit and The Lord Of The Rings when I was about 11 or 12 years old. Reading The Belgariad was absolutely transporting for an impressionable 13 year old in England and it was undoubtedly one of the things that made me want to be a writer.

Eddings released several other books, including prequels to The Belgariad, and gave credit to his wife Leigh who had apparently been his collaborator through all his work. Leigh died in 2007 after a series of strokes and now David has died two years later. It’s a very sad loss for the literary world, but he has certainly left us far richer with his work.

Vale, David Eddings.

Wikipedia page on Eddings here.

Good article By Jason Heller at Fantasy Magazine here.

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2 thoughts on “David Eddings dies at 77

  1. Was sad to hear when I caught word of it.

    Wasn’t what you;d call great ‘literature’ but was highly entertaining. Likewise for me it opened up the world of fantasy, which to that stage was pretty much Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. Never really looked back from then.

  2. Absolutely. A lot of stuff that’s not “great literature” by definition is the most long-lived and loved stuff out there.

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