Sci-Fi

2013 Aurealis Award winners announced

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April 8, 2014

Saturday was a big day. I drove down to Canberra, took part in the Conflux Writer’s Day minicon, where I did a highspeed “Social Media for Authors” presentation, then went for a quick change of clothes in order to attend the Aurealis Awards ceremony. Nicole Murphy, who organised everything that day, did a truly amazing job. The writers day and awards ceremony were both superb. We caroused and drank and laughed, and fantastic Australian fiction scored very well-deserved awards.

Here are all the fantastic nominees and winners. If you want a sampler of excellent recent Aussie spec fic, here’s your huckleberry:

(The winners are separated at the top of each list of nominees.)

Best Science Fiction Novel

  • Lexicon, Max Barry (Hachette)


  • Trucksong, Andrew Macrae (Twelfth Planet)
  • A Wrong Turn at the Office of Unmade Lists, Jane Rawson (Transit Lounge)
  • True Path, Graham Storrs (Momentum)
  • Rupetta, Nike Sulway (Tartarus)

Best Science Fiction Short Story

  • “Air, Water and the Grove”, Kaaron Warren (The Lowest Heaven)


  • “The Last Tiger”, Joanne Anderton (Daily Science Fiction 5/17/13)
  • “Mah Song”, Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories)
  • “Seven Days in Paris”, Thoraiya Dyer (Asymmetry)
  • “Version 4.3.0.1”, Lucy Stone (Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #57)

Best Fantasy Novel

  • A Crucible of Souls, Mitchell Hogan (self-published)


  • Lexicon, Max Barry (Hachette Australia)
  • These Broken Stars, Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner (Allen & Unwin)
  • Newt’s Emerald, Garth Nix (Jill Grinberg Literary Management)
  • Ink Black Magic, Tansy Rayner Roberts (FableCroft)

Best Fantasy Short Story

  • The Last Stormdancer, Jay Kristoff (Thomas Dunne)


  • “The Touch of the Taniwha”, Tracie McBride (Fish)
  • “Cold, Cold War”, Ian McHugh (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 6/13/13)
  • “Short Circuit”, Kirstie Olley (Oomph: A Little Super Goes a Long Way)
  • “The Year of Ancient Ghosts”, Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient Ghosts)

Best Horror Novel

  • Fairytales for Wilde Girls, Allyse Near (Random House Australia)


  • The Marching Dead, Lee Battersby (Angry Robot)
  • The First Bird, Greig Beck (Momentum)
  • Path of Night, Dirk Flinthart (FableCroft)

Best Horror Short Story

  • “The Year of Ancient Ghosts”, Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient Ghosts)


  • “Fencelines”, Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories)
  • “The Sleepover”, Terry Dowling (Exotic Gothic 5)
  • “The Home for Broken Dolls”, Kirstyn McDermott (Caution: Contains Small Parts)
  • “The Human Moth”, Kaaron Warren (The Grimscribe’s Puppets)

Best Young Adult Novel (Tie)

  • These Broken Stars, Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner (Allen & Unwin)
  • Fairytales for Wilde Girls, Allyse Near (Random House Australia)


  • The Big Dry, Tony Davies (Harper Collins)
  • Hunting, Andrea Host (self-published)
  • The Sky So Heavy, Claire Zorn (University of Queensland Press)

Young Adult Short Story

  • “By Bone-Light”, Juliet Marillier (Prickle Moon)


  • “Mah Song”, Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories)
  • “Morning Star”, D.K. Mok (One Small Step)
  • “The Year of Ancient Ghosts”, Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient Ghosts)

Best Collection

  • The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories, Joanne Anderton (FableCroft)


  • Asymmetry, Thoraiya Dyer (Twelfth Planet)
  • Caution: Contains Small Parts, Kirstyn McDermott (Twelfth Planet)
  • The Bride Price, Cat Sparks (Ticonderoga)
  • The Year of Ancient Ghosts, Kim Wilkins (Ticonderoga)

Best Anthology (Tie)

  • The Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2012, Liz Grzyb & Talie Helene, eds. (Ticonderoga)
  • One Small Step: An Anthology of Discoveries, Tehani Wessely, ed. (FableCroft)


  • Dreaming of Djinn, Liz Grzyb, ed. (Ticonderoga)
  • The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Of The Year: Volume Seven, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Night Shade)
  • Focus 2012: Highlights of Australian Short Fiction, Tehani Wessely, ed. (FableCroft)

Best Children’s Fiction

  • The Four Seasons of Lucy McKenzie, Kirsty Murray (Allen & Unwin)


  • Kingdom of the Lost, Book 2: Cloud Road, Isobelle Carmody (Penguin Group Australia)
  • Refuge, Jackie French (Harper Collins)
  • Song for a Scarlet Runner, Julie Hunt (Allen & Unwin)
  • Rules of Summer, Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia)
  • Ice Breaker: The Hidden 1, Lian Tanner (Allen & Unwin)

Best Illustrated Book/Graphic Novel (Tie)

  • Burger Force, Jackie Ryan (self-published)
  • The Deep Vol. 2: The Vanishing Island, Tom Taylor & James Brouwer (Gestalt)


  • Savage Bitch, Steve Carter & Antoinette Rydyr (Scar Studios)
  • Mr Unpronounceable Adventures, Tim Molloy (Milk Shadow)
  • Peaceful Tomorrows Volume Two, Shane W Smith (Zetabella)

The annual Aurealis Awards ceremony took place at the Great Hall, University House, Australian National University, Canberra. All the details of the awards can be found at the Aurealis Awards website.

Congratulations to all the winners and nominees!

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Far Voyager Postscripts #32/33 ToC announced

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April 7, 2014
Troop Inspection Pete Von Sholly 300x193 Far Voyager Postscripts #32/33 ToC announced

Pete Von Sholly’s “Troop Inspection” for Far Voyager.

This has been far and away the longest gap between a story sale and story publication, for many reasons mostly out of everyone’s control, but I’m very happy to say that Far Voyager Postscripts #32/33 from P S Publishing is finally coming out and it will include my story, Thirty Three Tears to a Teaspoon, along with a plethora of amazing writers. I’m really thrilled to be a part of this one. See the solid list of names below. And also check out that amazing cover artwork. It’s Pete Von Sholly’s “Troop Inspection”. You can click on that image for a larger version.

What’s also very exciting, apart from being in this publication myself, is that quite a few other great Aussies are in there too. As it’s a very well-respected UK publisher, it’s always great to see Australian voices represented. Along with myself are Angela Slatter, Lisa Hannett, Angie Rega, and Suze Willis.

The full ToC is shown below. I’ll be sure to post again when you can pre-order/buy the release.

Far Voyager — Ian Sales
3 A.M. in the Mesozoic Bar — Michael Swanwick
Dear Miss Monroe — Andrew Jury
The Case of the Barking Man — Mel Waldman
One Hundred Thousand Demons and the Cherub of Desire — Andrew Drummond
An American Story — Darrell Schweitzer
Irezumi — John Langan
Sister Free — Rio Youers
A Little Off the Top — Tom Alexander
Sweetheart, I Love You — Mel Waldman
Winter Children — Angela Slatter
A Girl of Feather and Music — Lisa L. Hannett
Thirty Three Tears to a Teaspoon — Alan Baxter
The Rusalka Salon for Girls Who Like to Get Their Hair Wet — Angie Rega
The Psychometrist — Suzanne J. Willis
Sea Angels — Quentin S. Crisp
Plink — Kurt Dinan
Xaro — Darren Speegle
We Are Not Alone — Richard Calder
The Curtain — Thana Niveau
Playground — Gio Clairval
What Once Was Bone — Gary A. Braunbeck
Darkscapes: Three Journeys to the Night Side — Mel Waldman
Services Rendered — Bruce Golden
GW in the Afterlife — Robert Reed
Eskimo — Andrew Hook
With Friends Like These — Gary Fry
An Inspector Calls — Ian Watson
Confessions — Mel Waldman
A Legion of Echoes — Alison Littlewood
Talk in Riddles — Mark Reece
The Mermaid and the Fisherman — Paul Park

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Dimension6 Issue 1 available now and it’s free

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April 4, 2014

D6badge 300x256 Dimension6 Issue 1 available now and its freeCoeur De Lion Publishing is one of Australia’s best small press outfits and they always produce fantastic work. You may remember a while ago I was going on about the Anywhere But Earth anthology, which is about the best science fiction short story anthology I’ve seen in years (and not only because I have a story in it!) Keith Stevenson, editor and owner of Coeur De Lion also produced the amazing X6 novella anthology, worth it for Paul Haines’ story Wives, apart from the other five sterling pieces of work therein.

Well, now Keith is weaving his magic again with a new project. Dimension6 is an ebook magazine, featuring three spec fic stories, three times a year and it’s both DRM-free and cashmoney free. That’s right – free to read on any device. Issue 1 is out now and you can get mobi or epub versions here. While you’re there, sign up for the D6 newsletter so you always know when a new issue comes out.

Issue #1 features:

‘Ryder’ by Richard Harland
Sent from bustling Sydney to boring country NSW during World War I, life is undeniably dull for Sally. Until she meets Ryder.

‘The Message’ by Charlotte Nash
On a future Earth ravaged by the Event, a soldier with a terrifying secret must travel behind enemy lines.

‘The Preservation Society’ by Jason Nahrung
For the undead, blood is more than sustenance. It’s a connection to the memory of life.

Issue 2 will feature three more great Australian authors including yours truly. My story, Upon a Distant Shore, will be in Dimension6 issue 2 in July. In the meantime, get your reading teeth (eye teeth?) into issue 1.

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2013 Aurealis Awards finalists announced

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February 16, 2014

AA logo 2013 Aurealis Awards finalists announcedAfter a record number of entries, the finalists for the 2013 Aurealis Awards have been announced.

The Aurealis Awards are Australia’s premier speculative fiction awards. The ceremony will take place April 5, 2014 in Canberra. The venue is the Great Hall, University House, Australian National University.

Doors open 7pm for drinks, ceremony begins at 8pm. Details here: http://www.aurealisawards.com/

Congratulations to all the very worthy nominees!

The 2013 Aurealis Awards Finalists are:

BEST ILLUSTRATED BOOK OR GRAPHIC NOVEL

Savage Bitch by Steve Carter and Antoinette Rydyr (Scar Studios)

Mr Unpronounceable Adventures by Tim Molloy (Milk Shadow Books)

Burger Force by Jackie Ryan (self-­‐published)

Peaceful Tomorrows Volume Two by Shane W Smith (Zetabella Publishing)

The Deep Vol. 2: The Vanishing Island by Tom Taylor and James Brouwer (Gestalt Publishing)

BEST CHILDREN’S BOOK

Kingdom of the Lost, book 2: Cloud Road by Isobelle Carmody (Penguin Group Australia)

Refuge by Jackie French (Harper Collins)

Song for a scarlet runner by Julie Hunt (Allen & Unwin)

The four seasons of Lucy McKenzie by Kirsty Murray (Allen & Unwin)

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia)

Ice Breaker: The Hidden 1 by Lian Tanner (Allen & Unwin)

BEST YOUNG ADULT SHORTFICTION

“Mah Song” by Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories, FableCroft Publishing)

“By Bone-­‐light” by Juliet Marillier (Prickle Moon, Ticonderoga Publications)

“Morning Star” by D.K. Mok (One  Small Step, an anthology of discoveries, FableCroft Publishing)

“The Year of Ancient Ghosts”  by Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient  Ghosts, Ticonderoga Publications)

BEST YOUNG ADULT NOVEL

The Big Dry by Tony Davies (Harper Collins)

Hunting by Andrea Host (self-­‐published)

These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan  Spooner (Allen & Unwin)

Fairytales for Wilde Girls by Allyse  Near (Random House  Australia)

The Sky So Heavy  by Claire Zorn (University of Queensland Press)

BEST HORROR SHORT FICTION

“Fencelines” by Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories, FableCroft Publishing)

“The Sleepover” by Terry Dowling (Exotic  Gothic 5, PS Publishing)

“The Home for Broken Dolls” by Kirstyn McDermott (Caution: Contains Small Parts, Twelfth Planet Press)

“The Human  Moth” by Kaaron Warren (The Grimscribe’s Puppets, Miskatonic Press)

“The Year of Ancient Ghosts” by Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient Ghosts, Ticonderoga Publications)

BEST HORROR  NOVEL

The Marching Dead by  Lee Battersby (Angry Robot Books)

The First Bird by  Greig Beck (Momentum)

Path of Night by Dirk Flinthart (FableCroft Publishing)

Fairytales for  Wilde Girls by Allyse Near (Random House Australia)

BEST FANTASY SHORT FICTION

“The Last Stormdancer” by  Jay Kristoff (Thomas Dunne Books)

“The  Touch of the  Taniwha” by Tracie McBride (Fish, Dagan  Books)

“Cold, Cold War” by Ian McHugh  (Beneath Ceaseless Skies,  Scott H  Andrews)

“ShortCircuit” by Kirstie Olley (Oomph: a little  super goes a long  way, Crossed Genres)

“The Year of Ancient Ghosts” by Kim Wilkins (The Year of Ancient Ghosts,  Ticonderoga Publications)

BEST FANTASY NOVEL

Lexicon by Max Barry  (Hachette Australia)

A Crucible of Souls by Mitchell Hogan (self-­‐published)

These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan  Spooner (Allen & Unwin)

Newt’s Emerald by Garth Nix (Jill Grinberg Literary Management)

Ink Black Magic by Tansy Rayner  Roberts (FableCroft Publishing)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION SHORT FICTION

“The Last Tiger” by Joanne Anderton (Daily Science Fiction)

“Mah Song” by Joanne Anderton (The Bone Chime Song and  Other Stories, FableCroft Publishing)

“Seven Days in Paris” by  Thoraiya Dyer (Asymmetry, Twelfth Planet Press)

“Version 4.3.0.1” by Lucy Stone (Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #57)

“Air, Water and  the Grove” by Kaaron Warren  (The Lowest Heaven, Pandemonium Press)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

Lexicon by Max Barry (Hachette)

Trucksong  by Andrew Macrae (Twelfth Planet Press)

A Wrong  Turn At The Office  Of Unmade Lists by Jane Rawson (Transit Lounge)

True Path by Graham Storrs (Momentum)

Rupetta by Nike Sulway (Tartarus Press)

BEST ANTHOLOGY

The Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2012  by Liz Grzyb and Talie Helene (Eds), (Ticonderoga Publications)

One  Small Step, An Anthology  Of Discoveries by Tehani Wessely (Ed) (FableCroft Publishing)

Dreaming Of Djinn by Liz Grzyb (Ed) (Ticonderoga Publications)

The Best Science Fiction  And Fantasy Of The  Year: Volume Seven by Jonathan Strahan (Ed) (NightShade Books)

Focus 2012: Highlights Of Australian Short Fiction by Tehani Wessely (Ed) (FableCroft Publishing)

BEST COLLECTION

The Bone Chime Song and  Other Stories by Joanne Anderton (FableCroft Publishing)

Asymmetry by Thoraiya Dyer (Twelfth Planet Press)

Caution: Contains Small Parts by Kirstyn McDermott (Twelfth Planet Press)

The Bride Price by Cat Sparks (Ticonderoga Publications)

The Year  of Ancient Ghosts by Kim  Wilkins (Ticonderoga Publications)

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10 Question SFF reading meme

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January 19, 2014

I saw this over at S F Signal, and thought it asked some interesting questions about sci-fi/fantasy/horror reading. So I’ve snurched it for my blog here. Feel free to copy the questions and add your answers in the comments, or snag it for your own blog, Facebook, blood-scrawling on the wall of your cold, wet dungeon or wherever else you like to write things down.

The last sf/f/h book I read and liked was:

On Stranger Tides by Tim Powers. This is the book that Pirates of the Caribbean was based on. It’s been on my To Read list for ages and I finally got around to it. It’s a brilliant book, the story far better than the movie. (Although, I do love those movies.)

The last sf/f/h book I read and wasn’t crazy about was:

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King. It’s not a bad book, but it’s far from a great book. It’s just kinda okay and I suppose I expect more than that from King. The previous King book I read, Joyland, was excellent.

The sf/f/h book I am reading now is:

North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud. This is a short story collection. I’ve never heard of Ballingrud before or read his stuff, but I saw this book being touted a lot in my social media. I always take the advice of those good people, so I bought it. I’ve only read the first two stories so far and it’s really quite excellent.

The sf/f/h book(s) I most want to read next is/are:

The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig and The Book of the Crowman by Joseph D’Lacey. The first is the third Miriam Black book and I was a huge fan of the first two, Blackbirds and Mockingbird. The second is Volume 2 of The Black Dawn. I read the first one, Black Feathers, a while back and it was very good. In fact, I reviewed these books for Thirteen O’Clock. Blackbirds here, Mockingbird here, and Black Feathers here.

An underrated sf/f/h book is:

I’m not sure about this, as I don’t really know what’s underrated among other people. If I had to pick something that certainly deserves more attention I would suggest Joanne Anderton’s Veiled Worlds trilogy. The third one of those is out soon. (Jo is a friend, yes, but her books are fucking amazing, so shut up.) Another book I read last year that blew me away and I haven’t seen much about it elsewhere is Max Barry’s amazing novel, Lexicon. And the last thing to spring to mind is a novella from Spectral Press that I read last year, called Whitstable by Stephen Volk. It’s an amazing blend of fact and fiction.

An overrated sf/f/h book is:

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. And not just because Card is a hoofwanking bunglecunt of the highest order. (I saw that insult on Twitter this morning and just had to find a place to use it.) But seriously, I hated this book before I really knew anything about Card’s despicable views. I read it because it’s always on top 100 sci-fi book lists so I thought I should try it. And it was very dull, and the central conceit was really obvious from early on and it’s just stupid. On that front, another highly overrated SF book is John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War. Now Scalzi isn’t a nasty piece of human sputum like Card. Scalzi is actually a stand-up guy, a really nice fella if my social media interaction is anything to go by and he does fantastic things for the SFF community. But this book did not work for me at all, I couldn’t finish it. I reviewed it briefly on Goodreads here if you’re interested in more of my opinion on it.

The last sf/f/h book that was recommended to me was:

I honestly can’t remember… I talk about books with people so much that it’s impossible to keep track. I know Lexicon was recommended to me not that long ago. Sorry, my brain isn’t up to this question.

A sf/f/h book I recommended to someone else was:

Recently I’ve been happily recommending these wherever I can:

Lexicon by Max Barry
Whitstable by Stephen Volk
The Dog-Faced Gods trilogy by Sarah Pinborough
Midnight & Moonshine by Angela Slatter and Lisa L Hannett
The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes
The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker
Cabal by Clive Barker

Seriously, if you’ve been stuck for a good read lately, go and buy all of those now and you’ll be reinvigorated. Amazing stories, brilliantly written.

A sf/f/h book I have re-read is:

The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker. I lovelovelove this book and recently reread it again. It is a truly outstanding achievement, but I’m a total Clive Barker fanboy, so maybe I’m biased. But seriously, if you haven’t read it, do. In fact, I’m going to add it to the list answering the previous question, because I’m always recommending this and Cabal by Barker whenever I get the chance. I’m adding Cabal too. I’d better stop there though – honestly, I could sit here and recommend books all day.

A sf/f/h book I want to re-read is:

The Earthsea series by Ursula K Le Guin. I’ve read and loved the original trilogy a few times, but never read the others. I recently bought all the various volumes and have them sitting on my side table ready for a big reread. (Well, reread of the first three, then read of the rest.) I’m really looking forward to it.

So there you go. I thought those questions might lead to an interesting discussion of good reading. Mmmmbooks, how I love them…

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Ghost of the Black back in print

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January 17, 2014

photo 300x300 Ghost of the Black back in printAfter a few requests from various places, I’ve made my sci-fi noir novella, Ghost of the Black: A ‘Verse Full of Scum, available in print again. It was originally self-published in serial form on this very website (and is still available to read here), then I made it available as an ebook and paperback through my little micro-press, Blade Red Press. It’s still available there as an ebook, even though Blade Red is on indefinite hiatus.

However, thanks to the wonders of CreateSpace, it’s now available in paperback again. You can find it in on Amazon here. It can also be ordered via Ingram’s and will propagate out to all the other online bookstores over time.

It’s a bit over 100 pages of magical, science fiction, crime noir fun, so if you’re keen, grab yourself a copy. Or it would make a fine gift for a friend. Here’s the blurb:

Ghost is possibly the best bounty hunter in the universe and he always gets the job done. At least, that’s the reputation that he rides on. When the DAP employ him to track down and capture a rogue Magicker who’s running across the galaxy killing anyone who gets in his way, Ghost realises that this is a job that could cost him his reputation. It’s also a job that could cost him his sanity. A sci-fi noir novella from the author of RealmShift and MageSign.

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365 Shorts Success!

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November 30, 2013

I’m as surprised as you are, but it seems I succeeded in the task I thought I was certain to fail. Towards the end of last year, I set myself a task to see if I could read 365 short stories in 365 days. I thought I’d never get close, but I wanted to record my short fiction reading and see how I went. Here’s the original post about it. I decided to set the year to start on December 1st 2012 so the end didn’t get lost in the Xmas/New Year shenanigans. That means the 365 days ran up until today, November 30th 2013. Instead of failing, I passed my target. I read 388 stories this year.

Now this has to be tempered with a few points of order. First and foremost, this includes podcasts. I listen to loads of short fiction podcasts – I’ve got a page all about them here. So I included listening as reading. I also included books and magazines that I’m in, but didn’t include my own story in the total count. Even so, I easily read past my limit. And it’s worth bearing in mind that my son was born at the end of October, so for just over the last month of this challenge, I’ve hardly read much at all. I think it’s fair to say I would have passed 400 if it wasn’t for that slight interruption to normal programming.

The thing this makes me realise more than anything else is that I probably read around this many stories every year. I made no special effort to make sure I hit my target. I listened to podcasts and read anthologies and magazines the same way I always do, and it turns out my personal challenge wasn’t much of a challenge after all. My eyeholes absorb that much short fiction on a regular basis regardless. Go me!

If you’re interested to see all the stories I read in the past 365 days, I’ve made a page here with all of them listed. Some were total shit, some were meh and some were absolutely outstanding. I haven’t bothered including any commentary on the list – it was a pain in the arse enough just to remember to write them all down as I went.

So it’s easy to read loads of short stories every year and you totally should. The form is fantastic, it takes hardly any time and the reward always far outweighs the effort. Unless the story was shit, of course, but that’s the risk you take. I read a story this year that won a massive award and I thought it was absolute bollocks. But that’s the beauty of art – there’s something to appeal to everyone and something to make everyone say, “That was bollocks.” You can usually find the magazines and editors whose taste gels with yours without too much effort and then you’re likely to get a hit rate of tasty yarns far higher than random sampling. But I’d recommend random sampling as well, because there are gems in every shitpile from time to time. Below, I’ll make a list of my favourite short fiction places, to get you started. This is certainly not an exhaustive list, just a shove in the right direction. Enjoy!

Great short fiction:

First and foremost, let’s get the shameless self-promotion out of the way. You can find a selection of my short fiction, free to read online, by checking out this page.

For great anthologies, check out the publications by these awesome Aussie small presses:

Ticonderoga Publications

Dark Prints Press

Coeur De Lion

(There are loads more out there.)

For excellent magazines, check out:

Abyss & Apex
Albedo One
Analog Science Fiction & Fact
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine
Apex Book Company
Asimov’s Science Fiction
Aurealis Magazine
Beneath Ceaseless Skies
Black Static
Chizine
Clarkesworld
Crowded Magazine
Daily Science Fiction
Escape Pod – sci-fi podcasting
Fantasy & Science Fiction
Ideomancer
Innsmouth Free Press
Interzone
Kasma SF
Lightspeed Magazine
Midnight Echo – magazine of the AHWA
Nightmare Magazine
PodCastle – fantasy fiction podcasts
Pseudopod – horror fiction podcasts
The Red Penny Papers
Shimmerzine
Strange Horizons
Ticon4
Wily Writers

Go forth, read short fiction and become a better person!*

(* May not actually make you a better person.)

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2013 British Fantasy Award and World Fantasy Award winners announced

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November 4, 2013

The British Fantasy Society announced the winners of the 2013 British Fantasy Awards at a ceremony during the World Fantasy Convention in Brighton, England on November 3, 2013. The full list of nominees is shown below, with the winner being the first entry in each category:

Best Novel (the August Derleth Fantasy Award)

  • Some Kind of Fairy Tale, Graham Joyce (Gollancz)

 

  • Red Country, Joe Abercrombie (Gollancz)
  • The Brides of Rollrock Island, Margo Lanagan (David Fickling)
  • Railsea, China Miéville (Macmillan)
  • Blood and Feathers, Lou Morgan (Solaris)

Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth Award)

  • Last Days, Adam Nevill (Macmillan)

 

  • The Kind Folk, Ramsey Campbell (PS)
  • Some Kind of Fairy Tale, Graham Joyce (Gollancz)
  • The Drowning Girl, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Roc)
  • Silent Voices, Gary McMahon (Solaris)

Best Novella

  • The Nine Deaths of Dr Valentine, John Llewellyn Probert (Spectral)

 

  • The Respectable Face of Tyranny, Gary Fry (Spectral)
  • “Curaré”, Michael Moorcock (Zenith Lives!)
  • Eyepennies, Mike O’Driscoll (TTA)

Best Short Story

  • “Shark! Shark!”, Ray Cluley (Black Static #29)

 

  • “Sunshine”, Nina Allan (Black Static #29)
  • “Our Island”, Ralph Robert Moore (Where Are We Going?)
  • “Wish for a Gun”, Sam Sykes (A Town Called Pandemonium)

Best Collection

  • Remember Why You Fear Me, Robert Shearman (ChiZine)

 

  • The Woman Who Married a Cloud, Jonathan Carroll (Subterannean)
  • Where Furnaces Burn, Joel Lane (PS)
  • From Hell to Eternity, Thana Niveau (Gray Friar)

Best Anthology:

  • Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane, Jonathan Oliver, ed. (Solaris)

 

  • Terror Tales of the Cotswolds, Paul Finch, ed. (Gray Friar)
  • The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women, Marie O’Regan, ed. (Robinson)
  • A Town Called Pandemonium, Anne C. Perry & Jared Shurin, eds. (Jurassic London)

Best Small Press (the PS Publishing Independent Press Award)

  • ChiZine Publications (Brett Alexander Savory & Sandra Kasturi)

 

  • Gray Friar Press (Gary Fry)
  • Spectral Press (Simon Marshall-Jones)
  • TTA Press (Andy Cox)

Best Non-Fiction

  • Pornokitsch, Anne C. Perry & Jared Shurin, eds.

 

  • Ansible, David Langford
  • The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature, Edward James & Farah Mendlesohn, eds. (Cambridge University Press)
  • Coffinmaker’s Blues (column), Stephen Volk (Black Static)
  • Fantasy Faction, Marc Aplin, ed.
  • Reflections: On the Magic of Writing, Diana Wynne Jones (David Fickling)

Best Magazine/Periodical

  • Interzone, Andy Cox, ed. (TTA)

 

  • Black Static, Andy Cox, ed. (TTA)
  • SFX, David Bradley, ed. (Future)
  • Shadows and Tall Trees, Michael Kelly, ed. (Undertow)

Best Artist

  • Sean Phillips

 

  • Ben Baldwin
  • Vincent Chong
  • Les Edwards
  • David Rix

Best Comic/Graphic Novel

  • Saga, Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples (Image)

 

  • The Unwritten, Mike Carey, Peter Gross, Gary Erskine, Gabriel Hernández Walta, M.K. Perker, Vince Locke, and Rufus Dayglo (Vertigo)
  • The Walking Dead, Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard (Skybound/Image)
  • Dial H, China Miéville, Mateus Santolouco, David Lapham, and Riccardo Burchielli (DC)

Best Screenplay

  • The Cabin in the Woods, Joss Whedon &Drew Goddard

 

  • Sightseers, Alice Lowe, Steve Oram, & Amy Jump
  • The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson, & Guillermo del Toro
  • Avengers Assemble, Joss Whedon

Best Newcomer (the Sydney J. Bounds Award)

  • Helen Marshall, for Hair Side, Flesh Side (ChiZine)

 

  • Saladin Ahmed, for Throne of the Crescent Moon (Gollancz)
  • Stephen Bacon, for Peel Back the Sky (Gray Friar)
  • Stephen Blackmoore, for City of the Lost (DAW)
  • Kim Curran, for Shift (Strange Chemistry)
  • Anne Lyle, for The Alchemist of Souls (Angry Robot)
  • Alison Moore, for The Lighthouse (Salt Publishing)
  • Lou Morgan, for Blood and Feathers (Solaris)
  • E.C. Myers, for Fair Coin (Pyr)
  • Molly Tanzer, for A Pretty Mouth (Lazy Fascist)

 

Also at the World Fantasy Convention, the World Fantasy Awards winners for works published in 2012 were announced on the same day.

Again, the full list of nominees is shown below, the World Fantasy Award winners being the first listed in each category:

Life Achievement:

  • Susan Cooper
  • Tanith Lee

Novel:

  • Alif the UnseenG. Willow Wilson (Grove; Corvus)

 

  • The Killing Moon, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Some Kind of Fairy Tale, Graham Joyce (Gollancz; Doubleday)
  • The Drowning Girl, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Roc)
  • Crandolin, Anna Tambour (Chômu)

Novella:

  • “Let Maps to Others”, K.J. Parker (Subterranean Summer ’12)

 

  • “Hand of Glory”, Laird Barron (The Book of Cthulhu II)
  •  The Emperor’s Soul, Brandon Sanderson (Tachyon)
  • “The Skull”, Lucius Shepard (The Dragon Griaule)
  • “Sky”, Kaaron Warren (Through Splintered Walls)

Short Story:

  • “The Telling”, Gregory Norman Bossert (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 11/29/12)

 

  • “A Natural History of Autumn”, Jeffrey Ford (F&SF 7-8/12)
  • “The Castle That Jack Built”, Emily Gilman (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 1/26/12)
  • “Breaking the Frame”, Kat Howard (Lightspeed 8/12)
  • “Swift, Brutal Retaliation”, Meghan McCarron (Tor.com 1/4/12)

Anthology:

  • Postscripts #28/#29: Exotic Gothic 4, Danel Olson, ed. (PS Publishing)

 

  • Epic: Legends of Fantasy, John Joseph Adams, ed. (Tachyon)
  • Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic, Eduardo Jiménez Mayo & Chris N. Brown, eds. (Small Beer)
  • Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane, Jonathan Oliver, ed. (Solaris)
  • Under My Hat: Tales from the Cauldron, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Random House)

Collection:

  • Where Furnaces Burn, Joel Lane (PS Publishing)

 

  • At the Mouth of the River of Bees, Kij Johnson (Small Beer)
  • The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories Volume One: Where on Earth and Volume Two: Outer Space, Inner Lands, Ursula K. Le Guin (Small Beer)
  • Remember Why You Fear Me, Robert Shearman (ChiZine)
  • Jagannath, Karin Tidbeck (Cheeky Frawg)

Artist:

  • Vincent Chong

 

  • Didier Graffet & Dave Senior
  • Kathleen Jennings
  • J.K. Potter
  • Chris Robert

Special Award Professional:

  • Lucia Graves for the translation of The Prisoner of Heaven (Weidenfeld & Nicholson; Harper) by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

 

  • Peter Crowther & Nicky Crowther for PS Publishing
  • Adam Mills, Ann VanderMeer, & Jeff VanderMeer for Weird Fiction Review
  • Brett Alexander Savory & Sandra Kasturi for ChiZine Publications
  • William K. Schafer for Subterranean Press

Special Award Non-Professional:

  • S.T. Joshi for Unutterable Horror: A History of Supernatural Fiction, Volumes 1 & 2 (PS Publishing)

 

  • Scott H. Andrews for Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • L. Timmel Duchamp for Aqueduct Press
  • Charles A. Tan for Bibliophile Stalker blog
  • Jerad Walters for Centipede Press
  • Joseph Wrzos for Hannes Bok: A Life in Illustration (Centipede Press)

Congratulations to all the winners and nominees in both Awards.

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Escape Artists need our help

By
0
October 14, 2013

You all know by now what a huge fan I am of short fiction podcasts. I listen to a whole bunch of them. I also love it when my own short fiction gets podcast, and that’s happened a few times now. I made a page here with all my own podcast fiction linked up and a list of all the audio fiction magazines I enjoy. Check it out, I promise you’ll find good stuff there (and not just my own stories.)

Among my absolute favourite short fiction podcasts are the three Escape Artist ones – Pseudopod for horror, Escape Pod for sci-fi and PodCastle for fantasy. They collect original and reprint fiction from a wide variety of sources and always commission excellent readers. These podcasts are regular, brilliantly produced and full of a broad range of stories. They also pay excellent rates to their authors. But they’re currently in dire financial straits and need some help – and it’s very easy to help them. All these type of online zines have options to subscribe or make once off donations to pay their server costs and authors. Until now, I’ve always gone to their sites at the end of each year and made a small donation.

But it it turns out that less than 1% of the people enjoying these otherwise free stories are regular subscribers. It’s got to the point where all three Escape Artist podcasts will have to shut down at the end of the year if they can’t increase their incomes. This would be a tragedy, because they’re awesome. So rather than remembering to make a once a year donation, I’ve just gone in and signed up as a regular monthly subscriber to all three. You can subscribe with as little as US$2 a month. That’s US$6 a month for all three. That’s not even two cups of coffee!

And no, they’re not paying me to say all this. Pseudopod published one of my stories and I hope all three podcasts are around long enough to publish more of my work. I’m just sharing their appeal because I love these podcasts, I wish more people would listen and I really wish more people would subscribe.

It’s as easy as clicking a PayPal button. If you’re a regular listener, go and sign up. If you’ve yet to discover the joys of Escape Artists, go now, subscribe for $2 a month and cancel your subscription if you decide it’s not worth. I bet you won’t.

Pseudopod is here (horror).

Escape Pod is here (sci-fi).

PodCastle is here (fantasy).

Go get some awesome short fiction in your listening holes.

.

ABE – Short film

By
0
September 5, 2013

A strange conversation on Facebook today led me to discover this short film. It’s a rather disturbing and dark sci-fi exploration of robots and feelings. Great production values.

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Welcome

The website of author Alan Baxter

Alan Baxter, Author

Author of horror, dark fantasy & sci-fi. Kung Fu instructor. Personal Trainer. Motorcyclist. Dog lover. Gamer. Heavy metal fan. Britstralian. Misanthrope. Learn more about me and my work by clicking About Alan just below the header.

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