Talking up the good stuff

I’ve been going on a lot lately about Bound. It’s no surprise, really. I have a book out from a major publisher and it’s on shelves in bookstores and everything! I’m still finding it hard to believe, but I’m certainly enjoying it. However, now I want to spread the love – I’ve been going on so much lately about myself, it’s time I talked about other people a bit. Below are the books and stories I’ve been really enjoying lately and I highly recommend you check them out. Let’s go:

The Hunt for Pierre Jnr By David M. Henley (the sequel, Manifestations, is out now too.) As the blurb says, “He can make you forget, he can control you and he is only eight years old. Three months after his birth he escaped. An hour later he was lost to surveillance. No one knows where he has been for the last eight years … Now Pierre Jnr is about to return.” Sounds good, right? It is.

Home & Hearth by Angela Slatter. All you need to know about this one is covered perfectly in Andrew McKiernan’s review here. I agree with him completely.

Last Year, When We Were Young by Andrew McKiernan. I had the pleasure of MCing the launch of this excellent debut collection of short stories. It’s fantastic and Greg Chapman sums it up nicely in this review here.

Exile by Peter M Ball. Okay, I haven’t read this one yet as I’ve only just bought it, but Peter Ball’s stuff is always good and I expect this novella to be up there as well. So I’m including it here.

Perfections by Kirstyn McDermott. This is a great novel and I reviewed it myself at Thirteen O’Clock, so head over here to learn more.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman. I mean, really, it’s enough that it’s by Gaiman, right? But this is a wonderful book and very British in style and setting. As an ex-pat Brit, that appealed to me a lot. But whether you’re British or not, it’s well worth your time.

SNAFU: An Anthology of Military Horror edited by Geoff Brown and A J Spedding. I had the honour of writing a foreword for this collection of military horror short stories. There’s fantastic variety here and it’s a tremendous collection. You’ll be surprised at the scope.

Trucksong by Andrew Macrae. A post-apocalyptic Australia with sentient trucks fighting and fucking and stuff. I know, right? It’s written in an incredibly well-developed Australian voice and is something quite different.

Galveston by Nic Pizzolatto. This is the guy who wrote True Detective, which is some of the best television I’ve seen in recent years. This is a southern crime noir kinda thing, fantasically written. I loved it.

North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud. Possibly the best short story collection I’ve read in recent years. Again, I reviewed it for Thirteen O’Clock, so go here to read me gushing about it.

Lexicon by Max Barry. My book of the year last year and it won an Aurealis Award. A fantastic story about the power of words and language and modern magic rolled up with science and it’s a thriller and… and… Just read it.

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes. A superb supernatural serial killer, crime thriller thing. This book has had loads of attention and all of it well-deserved. A must read.

And next up on my list are Guardian by Jo Anderton (which will be great because it’s book three after Debris and Suited, which were great), Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes (after the awesomeness of The Shining Girls, I can’t wait for this one) and Dreaming of Zhou Gong by Traci Harding (which I only got yesterday, signed no less, and I’m looking forward to a lot). Very exciting reading ahead, I think.

A quick web search will reveal any of these to you, so off you go and get some good stuff. Let me know what you think. And if you’ve read something simply brilliant lately, drop a mention in the comments and we can keep this sharing of good stuff going.

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The Bound train is staying in the station for a while now

Well, it’s been a truly glorious ride so far. Bound came out on July 1st and we’ve been pimping it all over the place. The Sydney launch at Kinokuniya was fantastic, we’ve been to Adelaide and Brisbane, also excellent. I’ve been up and down the south coast of NSW visiting stores. For now, the Bound train is rolling into the station and taking a break. We’re hoping to get down to Melbourne for an event there, but probably not until September when all three books will be out in ebook (and hopefully print won’t be far behind.) I’m doing a signing and author event at Nowra Library on Thursday August 28th at 11am, but nothing in particular between now and then. Other things may come up, of course, so watch the blog here and Facebook and Twitter. Links in the righthand sidebar.

I’ll still visit shops wherever I can, but thank you to everyone who’s got behind me and the book so far. It’s really been an absolute trip. I’ll list below all the places that have some signed stock, in case you’re keen for a signed copy Bound. Meanwhile, if you have been kind enough to pick up a copy, either print or ebook, and if you enjoyed it, please do talk about it. Regardless of all the touring and everything else, nothing is as effective as word of mouth. If you love a book, talk about it. Tell your colleagues at work if the opportunity comes up in conversation. Tell your family and friends about it, buy it for someone as a gift – I honestly think one of the best gifts you can give a person is a copy of a book you yourself have recently enjoyed. If you can be bothered to rate and/or review it on Goodreads, Amazon, iBook Store, Kobo, etc., then that’s also of fantastic value to authors.

The bottom line is simply to talk about the things you enjoy and other people will likely give them a go. My next post, as I’ve been crapping on about the Alex Caine books so much lately, will be all about the other books I’ve recently enjoyed. Meanwhile, Alex Caine #2, Obsidian, is out now in ebook. Alex Caine #3, Abduction, will be out in ebook soon. If you’re keen to see those in print, hassle your bookstore and ask them to hassle their rep about getting the print editions in. Meanwhile, you can get a signed copy of Bound (for you or as a gift!) from:

Kinokinuya Bookshop, Sydney

Galaxy Books, Sydney

Dymocks, Rundle Mall, Adelaide

Collins Booksellers, Edwardstown, Adelaide

Avid Reader, Brisbane

Pulp Fiction, Brisbane

Dymocks, Brisbane City

Dymocks, Indooroopilly

Riverbend, Brisbane

Bowral Books, Bowral

Dymocks, Nowra

Dymocks, Wollongong

QBD Bookshop, Shellharbour

… I think that’s it. There may be that are eluding me now as my brain is a bit mushy. If you want a signed copy, but cant find one or aren’t near any of those stores, give me a shout and we’ll figure something out.

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Obsidian, Alex Caine #2, out now in ebook in Aus and NZ!

Obsidian-coverHard to believe, I know, given that it seems like Bound has only just come out. Well, that’s because Bound has only just come out! But Harper Voyager are giving ebook readers that digital first binge read opportunity. Bound is still free until the end of July, and Obsidian, Alex Caine #2, is out already and only $4.99 across all Australian and New Zealand ebook stores.

Obsidian is another standalone Alex Caine book, but it’s the second in a series and effectively the middle book of the first trilogy. Could I make it any more complicated? Yes, I probably could, but it’s actually not so bad. Each Alex Caine book is a standalone novel. There are threads that continue throughout the series and several major parts of a bigger story arc are wrapped up the first three books. But there are still some small things left tantalisingly hanging that I’ll hopefully get the opportunity to address in future installments.

Here’s the blurb for Obsidian:

Alex Caine wishes he had a direction, but it pays to be careful what you wish for.

Alex Caine is looking for direction and trying to build a new life with his recently acquired magical talents, and Kin girlfriend, Silhouette. He is recruited by a secret organisation to head off an impending doom, foretold by Seers as already somehow linked to his destiny. Claude Darvill is desperately trying to get in touch with his father, Robert Hood. When the company, Black Diamond, reveals that Hood had gone missing after chasing Alex Caine, Darvill takes over control of Black Diamond and starts hunting Caine himself. Alex and his crew close in on three amateur mages in Britain’s north, who think they have uncovered ancient magic that will reveal great powers. But they are caught in a vortex and pulled through to a strange lost city, isolated in the void. Trapped in a place removed from everything they know, ruled by a hierarchy of monsters, Alex and his friends must find a way to escape Obsidian.

This is my great “lost city” novel that I’ve always wanted to write and I had a load of fun with the worldbuilding. It’s got the same great action, martial arts, monsters and twisted mythology that you found in Bound, only ramped up even more. You can learn more about it on the Obsidian page here, or just go and buy it from your favourite ebook store right now.

If you’re keen to see the print edition of Obsidian (and let’s be honest, who isn’t, right?) be sure to hassle your local book shop for it. The shop will tell their reps, the reps will tell the publisher and we’ll get everything moving along sooner rather than later.

I really hope you enjoy Obsidian. If you do enjoy Bound and Obsidian, please tell people about them. Nothing is of more value to an author than word of mouth, so even if you’re not the type to review or rate on Goodreads and the iBook Store, etc., just telling people about books you enjoy is absolutely gold. Mention it on Twitter or Facebook, tell your friends and colleagues and family. And not just about my books, but about all the books you enjoy. Signal boost the good stuff by telling people how good it is. It makes you a better person and every time you recommend a book, an orphan gets a new puppy. It’s true, it’s like magic, you wouldn’t believe it.

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Five Qs with Dr Angela Slatter

Angela3You guys have heard me talk about Angela Slatter plenty before. She’s a good friend of mine, but more than that, she’s one of the best writers I know. Specialising in dark fantasy and horror, she’s the author of the Aurealis Award-winning The Girl with No Hands and Other Tales, the World Fantasy Award finalist Sourdough and Other Stories, and the Aurealis finalist Midnight and Moonshine (with Lisa L. Hannett). And that’s just a fraction of her bio. She’s the first Aussie to win a British Fantasy Award too. Check out all about her publications and awards here.

Angela has a new chapbook out from Spectral Press called Hearth and Home. It’s a great read and I’ve asked her five questions about it and about horror and her writing in general. The questions are below, but before you read them, go and get the chapbook, as it’s limited edition and there aren’t many left. You can send an email to spectralpress[AT]gmail[DOT]com or maybe get one of the last ones from Angela herself by emailing me[at]angelaslatter[dot]com

You won’t be sorry. So, on with the Qs:

1. What’s “Hearth and Home” all about and why did you write this story?

Well, it’s about a woman whose teenaged son has come home after a lengthy trial. He was found innocent but things are not as they should be, life doesn’t return to ‘normal’. Basically it’s the story of Caroline’s journey through figuring out just how far from normal things are. I wrote it because Simon Marshall-Jones from Spectral Press had said ‘Sooo, hey, how about a chapbook story?’ And I’d seen the work he’d done with other authors such as Gary McMahon in the chapbook series and thought ‘Yep, get me some of that!’

2. What’s the real draw card for you with horror?

I don’t mind gore if it’s well used and cleverly placed for maximum effect, but I really, really hate explicit shock for the sake of shock. It has a numbing effect after a while and that is not the point of horror for me. Horror is about the creeping shiver that becomes a full-blooded scream … I enjoy the psychology of that journey, that’s what wraps me up in a good horror story.

Home & Hearth Front Cover3. Chapbooks are still cool. Why?

I think they’ve never really gone out of fashion in particular, i.e. genre, quarters, and they’re now riding the wave of small press resurgence. I think that’s because small presses are in a unique position to create books that aren’t your traditional trade paperback with the imperative to sell millions. That’s not to say they don’t want to make money, but there’s definitely a place for books are collectable artefacts that remains even in an age of e-books and the throwaway paperback.

I also like to think that you can see the craft in them, they don’t necessarily look like something that’s from a cookie cutter … there’s an individuality to them that feels very human and person-made.

4. If you could organise one of those haunted house murder mystery dinners, who would you invite? And who would be the killer?

Oooooh. I’m going to ask the living and the dead, the real and the imagined! Angela Carter and Tanith Lee, Tom Hiddleston and Benedict Cumberbatch, Robert Shearman and Lisa Hannett, Mark Gatiss and Christopher Lee, Helen Marshall and Helen Mirren. And Neil Gaiman, who would be the killer and whom no one would suspect coz he always seems so nice.

5. What’s next for Doctor Slatter?

Dr Slatter has three books out this year: The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings (from Tartarus Press), Black-Winged Angels (from Ticonderoga Publications), and The Female Factory (written with Lisa Hannett and coming out from Twelfth Planet Press). No matter what anyone tells you, I am open to working with publishers that don’t start with the letter ‘T’.

I currently have a novel called Vigil doing the rounds; I am finishing my novella for Spectral Press, which is called The Witch’s Scale; and I’m finishing up my collection The Tallow-Wife and Other Tales, which is the result of my Queensland Writers Fellowship year; I’m working on another novel called Scandalous Lady Detective, and going back to an old novel called Well of Souls to finish it off.

In between I am occasionally offering an editing and story development service, but it’s starting to feel like a bit of a time-squeeze at this point!

Find out more about Angela here: www.angelaslatter.com/

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Adelaide this weekend, Brisbane the one after

So the Bound train rolls on, and I’m having a ball! I’ll be heading down to Adelaide this weekend, then up to Brisbane the weekend after. If you’re near either of those cities, I’d love to see you. Below are the details and a few links to relevant events.

Adelaide

Saturday, July 19th I’ll be doing a signing at Collins Edwardstown from 1.00 to 2.00pm. There’s a Facebook Event page here. Please come on by and say hello – it’s at Collins Booksellers, Shop 54, Castle Plaza, 992 South Road, Edwardstown.

If you can’t make it on Saturday, the day before, Friday, July 18th, I’ll be dropping briefly into Dymocks in Rundle Mall around 12.30, so if you’re in the city, it would be great to see you then.

Also on Friday afternoon, I’ll be having a chat with Richard Stubbs on ABC 774 Melbourne via live link.

Brisbane

Friday, July 25th is going to be loads of fun. From 6.00 to 8.00pm I’ll be at Avid Reader Bookshop at 193 Boundary Street, West End, where I will be in conversation with the excellent Kylie Chan, hosted by the equally excellent Trent Jamieson. There will be a bunch of other awesome writers in attendance and all kinds of other cool people, plus wine. How can you go wrong? There’s a Facebook Event page for this one too, right here, and here’s the Avid page where you can book a ticket.

I’ll try to visit other stores in the region of these events and sign stock, so watch my Twitter and Facebook pages for updates.

And Melbourne, we haven’t forgotten you! We’re working on something in your fine city and I’ll be sure to let you know when and where that is once it’s sorted out.

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